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PHP or RoR?

Thread title: PHP or RoR?
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07-09-2007, 12:02 AM
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Haris is offline Haris
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  Old  PHP or RoR?

Yeah, I've been reading this book "Agile web development with Ruby on Rails". The language is a bit confusing and I'm unsure if I can create anything with RoR. It has different and confusing naming convection, the class in model automatically detects the table from the database using the pluralize form. For example if the class is named person, it will look for table named people in the database. I like the database migrations, few ruby features (NOTE: Ruby) and bit of naming convection and the templating system but rails is a confusing framework.

The downside of the book I have is that it doesn't goes from basic to advance features but advance to basics. You've to create a store at the start and then learn all the features of RoR. I have created the store but I don't even know the proper conditional statements.

Whereas PHP is lengthy unlike RoR but PHP is supported with a strong user-base. There is no confusing naming convections.

I don't know any downsides of PHP but I've used it before to create a register/login feature.

What should I do?

07-09-2007, 12:05 AM
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Max Nachamkin is offline Max Nachamkin
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I really think you should go with PHP. All though Ruby on Rails is a "new technology" with a "good future", there are currently more resources for PHP available. They have a great manual on their website (www.php.net), and you can use scripts. It's way more customizable and WAY easier to use in my opinion. Good luck!

07-09-2007, 01:35 AM
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Learn php first, is is without a doubt the industry standard.

07-09-2007, 01:53 AM
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If you don't really know how to program in other languages, I'd recommended picking up a good book on just plain Ruby. Knowing the underlying language will help make learning Rails easier. Also the know more about the Object Orientation, and other programming techniques will help you greatly.

If you knew other programming languages you might be able to get by without this.

PHP and Ruby both have their strengths and weaknesses (I build in both). Ruby/Rails is tougher to pickup but once you get over the hump you'll find it makes a lot sense.

The big issue I still have with Rails in the scalability of the applications and the limited hosting options, both of which are improving.

Mubs

07-09-2007, 04:23 AM
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I'm about 140pgs into the Agile book atm and I'm working on adding the check-out feature to my shopping cart. I'd have to say at this stage I'm very curious at learning more about the framework. As you've mentioned, this book does seem to start from a more advanced level.

I'm understanding everything so far, but don't know any of the details about the framework. Pgs 228-598, however, are dedicated to covering the framework, so I'm thinking that's when you really get to know what you're doing. Did you read the entire book Haris?

I've programmed PHP for around 5yrs and I would recommend you learn both PHP and RoR

07-09-2007, 09:04 AM
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Originally Posted by DJAC View Post
I'm about 140pgs into the Agile book atm and I'm working on adding the check-out feature to my shopping cart. I'd have to say at this stage I'm very curious at learning more about the framework. As you've mentioned, this book does seem to start from a more advanced level.

I'm understanding everything so far, but don't know any of the details about the framework. Pgs 228-598, however, are dedicated to covering the framework, so I'm thinking that's when you really get to know what you're doing. Did you read the entire book Haris?

I've programmed PHP for around 5yrs and I would recommend you learn both PHP and RoR
I've not read the entire book but I stopped because I was completely confused. Do you recommend me starting over again because that could help me but would be time consuming.

Originally Posted by iisbum View Post
If you don't really know how to program in other languages, I'd recommended picking up a good book on just plain Ruby. Knowing the underlying language will help make learning Rails easier. Also the know more about the Object Orientation, and other programming techniques will help you greatly.

If you knew other programming languages you might be able to get by without this.

PHP and Ruby both have their strengths and weaknesses (I build in both). Ruby/Rails is tougher to pickup but once you get over the hump you'll find it makes a lot sense.

The big issue I still have with Rails in the scalability of the applications and the limited hosting options, both of which are improving.

Mubs
I know about MVC framework because it was clearly described in the book and is used by Rails. I don't have any idea on OOP. I've only heard that PHP5 comes with OOP and then never got into researching about it. I guess scalability issue will be non-existing in a few months since lot of hosting companies are starting to support RoR.

I'm looking into this http://www.pragmaticprogrammer.com/titles/fr_ltp/ but there are many resources available for beginners at www.ruby-lang.org

Originally Posted by Village Idiot View Post
Learn php first, is is without a doubt the industry standard.
Thanks for the advice.

Originally Posted by Max Nachamkin View Post
I really think you should go with PHP. All though Ruby on Rails is a "new technology" with a "good future", there are currently more resources for PHP available. They have a great manual on their website (www.php.net), and you can use scripts. It's way more customizable and WAY easier to use in my opinion. Good luck!
But way lengthy.

07-09-2007, 12:01 PM
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I think you've either not noticed or chosen to ignore an important factor here. RoR is just a framework built on top of Ruby. A similar example would be Zend (Framework), Symphony, CakePHP or CodeIgniter for PHP -- they're frameworks built on top of the language.

So more correctly, it would be better to compare PHP and Ruby or RoR with PHP frameworks (there are lots around).

07-09-2007, 12:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Salathe View Post
I think you've either not noticed or chosen to ignore an important factor here. RoR is just a framework built on top of Ruby. A similar example would be Zend (Framework), Symphony, CakePHP or CodeIgniter for PHP -- they're frameworks built on top of the language.

So more correctly, it would be better to compare PHP and Ruby or RoR with PHP frameworks (there are lots around).
Actually, I did wanted to compare Ruby with PHP but since the framework is used widely instead of ruby itself, I thought comparing the framework with the widely known language would be better.

So what are your thoughts on this?

07-09-2007, 01:52 PM
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Haris,

As I've mentioned, I haven't completed the book yet. I've just been coding the shopping cart step by step and getting a feel for RoR. I'm pretty sure going through the 270 pages detailing the framework (pgs 228-598) will really help bring things together.

If you really want to learn something, it'll take time, so you have to be willing to spend the time. This is one of the top books on RoR, so I suggest you stick to it.

It took me about 2 weeks to build my first site using PHP and I was self-taught, but since then I haven't stopped learning and improving my skills because there's so much you can do.

07-09-2007, 05:28 PM
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Originally Posted by DJAC View Post
Haris,

As I've mentioned, I haven't completed the book yet. I've just been coding the shopping cart step by step and getting a feel for RoR. I'm pretty sure going through the 270 pages detailing the framework (pgs 228-598) will really help bring things together.

If you really want to learn something, it'll take time, so you have to be willing to spend the time. This is one of the top books on RoR, so I suggest you stick to it.

It took me about 2 weeks to build my first site using PHP and I was self-taught, but since then I haven't stopped learning and improving my skills because there's so much you can do.
Thanks for the advice. The book is a little confusing without basics so I'm going to go through http://rubylearning.com/satishtalim/tutorial.html first.

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